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Camps & Clinics Page

09/20/2017, 1:30pm EDT
By Webmaster

Camps and Clinics

Webster Youth Hockey posts any Announcements sent to us by vendors for camps and clinics at www.wyha.com/campsandclinics See this page for cost, information and flyers!

There are generally camps run by Strong Hockey on any School Vacation days at Webster RInk (Columbus Day, Veterans Day, MLK, etc.)

Webster Trophy Vendor for any Team who orders Trophies for their Players

09/20/2017, 12:15pm EDT
By Peewee Major 12U Travel

Webster Trophy Vendor

This vendor offers competitive prices to any Webster team that orders promotional items from them

The Cost of Winning Video

09/17/2017, 4:45pm EDT
By Webster Youth Hockey

Cost of Winning Video

All,

A video has been placed on the home page of the WNYAHL website www.wnyahl.net titled The Cost of Winning and it is worth watching by anyone in youth sports not just hockey. Video is about 13 minutes long. The premise is that youth sports in general not just hockey is on a decline and its time for action and accountability.

The author, Matt Young is striving to continue to draw attention to the culture of youth sports. The video is the trailer that Matt has future plans to launch as an extended piece down the road.

Coaching Requirements

09/07/2017, 5:15pm EDT
By Copied from

Why Do Coaches Have to be Trained?

The following was borrowed from a recent Amateur Hockey Association Illinois (AHAI) newsletter:
 
"USA Hockey and the Coaching Education Program (CEP) require: USA Hockey Registration, Screening, SafeSport Training, Age Specific Module completion and the appropriate Level CEP clinic to be eligible to coach. Why?
 
The answer is rather simple; the kids deserve it. What do I mean by that? As parents, you turn your children over to their coaches for several hours a week. After parents and teachers, your kids spend more time with coaches than probably anyone else during the season. USA Hockey and AHAI want that experience to be the best and safest it can be. Only properly educated coaches can help in the development of your skaters both on and off the ice. Coaches have a massive responsibility. Most of us remember our coaches; both the good and the bad. The effect they have on players can be immense and with that comes great responsibility.
  • Coaching Education Program (CEP) Online Age-Specific Requirements (Must be completed PRIOR to participating in any team activities and cannot be added to a roster until completed)
  • USA Hockey Requirements: Register as a member of USA Hockey, complete background screening and complete USAH SafeSport Training (Must be completed PRIOR to participating in any team activities and cannot be added to a roster until completed)

This Article was copied to all organizations in Western New York.

USA Hockey Rule Change - No Icing Allowed

USA Hockey has approved a major Rule Change for 2017 to 2021.  Teams playing in Squirt/U10, Peewee/U12 and Bantam/U14 divisions will NOT be allowed to ice the puck during a short handed situation.

Below are links to two articles explaining the new Rule and the reasoning behind the Change:

From the WNYAHL website:
http://www.wnyahl.net/news_article/show/805195?referrer_id=105310
Modified Shorthanded Icing Rule Delivers More Skill Development
06/18/2017, 9:45pm EDT    By J. Cavaretta
     USA Hockey has modified its playing rules for the 14-and-Under age classification and all younger age classifications (youth and girls) to no longer legalize icing while a team is shorthanded. Beginning with the 2017-18 season, if a team ices the puck while shorthanded, it will result in a whistle followed by a defensive-zone faceoff. The team that commits an icing infraction will be allowed to change lines and/or players prior to the defensive-zone faceoff.

     The rationale behind this rule change is twofold.
      First, and most importantly, the change will encourage greater skill development for 10U, 12U and 14U players. These young athletes are in their prime skill development windows and will benefit greatly from the increased emphasis this rule change places on promoting puck possession, puck protection and play-making (as opposed to merely firing the puck down the ice, which is a low-skill tactic). Second, the change prevents a penalized team from gaining an exception to a rule (icing) that is in effect while teams are at even strength.
     “We want to encourage players to get their heads up, think and make skillful, intelligent plays,” said Ken Martel, the technical director of USA Hockey’s American Development Model. “To develop problem-solving skills, we need rules that encourage players to think. Modifying the shorthanded icing rule will accomplish that. Rather than just blasting the puck down the ice, they’ll now be encouraged to skate or pass their way out of trouble, use greater touch to chip a puck out, or even take advantage of a lazy power play and go on the attack.”
     Data collected from nearly 200 games played under this modified rule showed that the average number of shorthanded icings per game was only 1.81. Therefore, there were fewer than two stoppages per game due to this rule, which dispels the myth that it will ruin the flow of games and make them dramatically longer.
     USA Hockey has successfully used this modified rule for more than 10 years at its National Player Development Camps. Players adapt almost immediately and more shorthanded scoring opportunities are created by the play-making mindset that it nurtures.
     “Skill development and play-making is an emphasis at the professional level and it should be an absolute priority at the youth levels, so I support USA Hockey’s decision to change the rule,” said Mike Sullivan, Pittsburgh Penguins head coach and back-to-back Stanley Cup champion. “It will encourage kids to make more skill plays with the puck, and that will help develop their full potential as players.”

From the USA Hockey website (August Issue of the USA Hockey Magazine, pg 30-31):
http://touchpointmedia.uberflip.com/i/850546-august-2017
The New Ice Age
Rule Change Promotes Skill Development By Prohibiting Shorthanded Teams From Icing The Puck
By Harry Thompson
     Before we talk about the new rule that will change the way youth hockey teams kill penalties, let’s begin with a brief history lesson.
     Back in the 1930s, the Montreal Canadiens were steamrolling through the NHL thanks in part to a potent power play. In order to keep games from becoming lopsided affairs, the league allowed teams that committed a penalty to ice the puck to relieve the pressure of the Habs’ attack.

     The rule was soon adopted at all levels of play, with the exception of the upstart World Hockey Association, which didn’t allow short-handed teams to ice the puck.
     “It’s never made any sense to me that a team can commit a foul and then the rules are changed to benefit them,” said long-time USA Hockey coach Ben Smith.
     “There’s no need to change the rules of the game just because somebody committed a foul. Keep playing the game the way it was meant to be played.”
     Which leads us to June 13, 2017, when USA Hockey’s board of directors voted to adopt a rule change that eliminates shorthanded icing exceptions at the 14 & Under age levels.
     Now, if a team ices the puck while short-handed, it will result in a whistle followed by a defensive-zone faceoff. The team that commits an icing infraction will still be allowed to change players. The rule takes effect at the start of the 2017-18 season.
     The rationale behind the rule change is that it encourages greater skill development for younger players who are in their prime development windows.
Most coaches and development experts feel it will place a greater emphasis on puck possession, puck protection and play-making, as opposed to merely firing the puck down the ice.
     “You can go any rink in America on a Saturday morning and hear some of the parents in the stands screaming for kids to ice the puck during a penalty,” Smith said. “It’s just dumbing down the game to ask a kid to take the puck, which
encouraging him to throw it away. It just goes against all development sense.”
      It’s a sentiment shared by those at the pinnacle of the game.

      “Skill development and play-making is an emphasis at the professional level and it should be an absolute priority at the youth levels, so I support USA Hockey’s decision to change the rule,” said Mike Sullivan, who led the Pittsburgh Penguins to back-to-back Stanley Cup titles.
     “It will encourage kids to make more skill plays with the puck, and that will help develop their full potential as players.”
     USA Hockey has been using this modified playing rule for more than 10 years at its National Player Development Camps. According to those who have worked these camps, players quickly adapt and more short-handed scoring opportunities are created by the play-making mindset that it nurtures.
     “Kids will adapt very quickly. That’s been my experience, whether it’s at our National Player Development Camps or in a house league in Red Lodge, Mont.,” said former USA Hockey National Coach-in-Chief Al Bloomer.
     “The only people who will have a challenge adapting to the change will be the coaches and parents.”
     Detractors claim the change will result in more whistles, which will make games last longer. It’s an argument that doesn’t hold water, according to data collected from nearly 200 games played under the modified rule. In fact, there were on average fewer than two additional stoppages per game due to this rule.
     In addition, studies have found that power-play goals didn’t go up, but the number of shorthanded tallies did as kids were forced to make a play with the puck rather than blindly fire it the length of the ice.
     Supporters feel this rule change is long overdue and could pave the way for other leagues and federations to follow suit in the future.
     “Any part of our game that encourages puck possession rather than throwing the puck away is a tremendous opportunity to develop skill,” Smith said. “This is going to encourage players to have to make plays with the puck. For me this rule is a clear-cut win for skill development.”

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